7 Things That Keep You From Charging What You’re Worth (and how to get over them)

Charging people money is scary. Having people I’ve never met ask me to produce something I have metaphorically promised the world I can do at a professional level, that may or may not meet their expectations, is terrifying. There is so much I can’t control – the weather, the mood of everyone involved, my camera suddenly deciding to jam without warning, that nerve condition I Googled last night where something snaps in your eyeball without warning and you go blind in mere seconds. Never mind that every single time I leave my house, I’m pretty sure that I am completely out of any possible creativity, creativity that will never renew itself, and it’s only a matter of time before everyone realizes I’m just a fraud that got lucky for a while.

And that’s on a good day.

Portrait photography: a definitive journey through the customer experience

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This article (and the journey, listed below) is a long one, so I’m going to keep the intro here very short. Let’s get right into an example journey (customer experience) that you can guide your clients through as a portrait photographer.

When the client is visiting your website

  • Have an outstanding portfolio. Make sure to keep some images “up your sleeve” though.
  • Make sure your images are large and look great (they’re sharp, not pixellated, etc.).
  • Make sure your website looks great on a mobile device.
  • Ensure your website delivers a simple, streamlined experience on the web.

10 Insights for Better Interior Photography:

Which is Better, Natural or Artificial Light?

You’ve heard of Frank Lloyd Wright, but have you heard of Ezra Stoller? A few years ago, NPR ran a story on Stoller with the headline The Photographer Who Made Architects Famous. You’ve probably seen some of his iconic images, including black and white interiors of the Guggenheim Museum, Seagram Building, and T.W.A. Terminal. Stoller was famously unpretentious. He once said, “I’m not interested in art photography. I’m interested in architecture as it is, to look at and enjoy.” Still, he was a master with a singular command of light.